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Stay Healthy

Maintaining optimal levels of musculoskeletal health is a lifelong process, and each of us can do small things every day to improve movement and flexibility, as well as help manage problems as they arise.

Slocum’s physicians and surgeons have years of experience in helping people live in motion. Here are some tips they’d like to share.

 

Dr. Lisa Pomranky Says . . .

When you have an acute injury, ice and elevate the body part within the first 72 hours to help with swelling. Icing for 15 to 20 minutes every few hours is recommended. Using heat during this time could increase the swelling from injury.

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Dr. Lisa Pomranky Says . . .

Calcium and vitamin D are vital for bone health. The recommended daily calcium intake for adults over 50 is 1200-1500mg per day and 1000mg per day for people under 50. This should be divided into three doses of 500-600mg or less. Most people get 500mg from their diets and would likely only need 500-1000mg of supplementation. Vitamin D at 1000-2000IU daily is recommended as a supplement because calcium is not absorbed properly without adequate vitamin D levels in the body.

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Dr. Lisa Pomranky Says . . .

Osteoporosis is a silent, progressive disease that weakens the bones. Women over the age of 65 and men over the age of 70 should be screened with a bone density test. A bone density exam is referred to as a DXA, which stands for dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Your doctor may recommend this after a fracture occurs (depending on how the fracture was sustained) as some fractures occur at increased frequency in people with osteoporosis.

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Dr. Michael Koester Says . . .

Watch for these warning signs of a concussion: vomiting, severe headache, and difficulty staying awake or answering simple questions.  Take the person to the emergency room immediately if any of these symptoms are present after a head injury. Remember, an athlete does not have to lose consciousness to suffer a concussion.

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Dr. Matthew Shapiro Says . . .

There is a lot of controversy about the use of performance enhancing drugs. Steroids certainly cause remarkable strength and conditioning benefits, but the downside of using them is high, and they are, after all, banned substances. Nutritional supplements are a little less clear.  Supplements, including creatine and vitamins as well as chondroitin and glucosamine, are not regulated by the FDA. In fact, they're really not regulated at all.  So when you buy a supplement, you can't be certain that what you get is what's on the label.  Also, what's in any particular bottle varies from product to product and batch to batch. There's no scientific evidence that they are helpful, and there is some evidence that they can increase cramping, heat stroke, and heat illness. Please use these links to review advisory statements by the Sports Medicine Advisory Committee of the National Federation of State High School Associations for more information.

Energy Drink Statement

Steroid Statement

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Dr. Lisa Pomranky Says . . .

A good workout routine includes cardiovascular exercise, flexibility training, core strengthening, and muscle building. Cardiovascular exercise, such as running and biking, keeps the heart healthy and can control blood pressure. Core training and muscle building are important for balance and reflexes, which help keep people independent as they age.

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Dr. Lisa Pomranky Says . . .

Flexibility and muscle building are just as important for your health as cardiovascular exercise.

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Dr. Lisa Pomranky Says . . .

Trigger fingers (fingers that lock and catch) have a high likelihood of being cured with simple in-office injections.

The exception to this would be in diabetic patients who do not tend to respond as well to injections.

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Dr. Lisa Pomranky Says . . .

Not all finger injuries are "just a jammed finger."  To be sure, get your finger examined. An X-ray may also be necessary. Many injuries require proper splinting and sometimes hand therapy to avoid deformity or stiffness.

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